Francis Njamnjoh, Peter Vakunta, Patrice Nganang, Mongo Beti and Ferdinand Oyono to name but a few frequently resort to pidginization as a mode of linguistic and cultural appropriation.Cameroonians, in general, resort to Pidgin English for the purpose of phatic communion in informal contexts.

Oftentimes, these distortions are purposefully created for the sake of re-enacting personal or collective life experiences.

Of the over 200 indigenous languages spoken by Cameroonians, only Pidgin enjoys the privilege of being spoken by people from all walks of life and social strata.

The word taal is the Afrikaans word for "language".

Tsotsitaal is built on the grammar of several indigenous languages, namely Xhosa, Tsonga, Tswana, Venda, Zulu and Sotho.

A critical understanding of Pidgin English requires not only a thorough grasp of the socio-cultural matrices from which the words and expressions originate but also an immersion in an Afro-centric worldview.

Pidgin is believed to be the parlance of the proverbial man-in-the-street in many parts of Africa. Pidgin accommodates grammatical distortions and deviations from syntactic conventions.It is a permanent work of language-mixing, code-switching, and word smiting. Later, it acquired the status of a prestigious sign of rebellion against the state and its police force.Linguistic creativity is the main characteristic of Tsotsitaal-speakers. At present, Tsotsitaal refers to any gang or street language in South Africa.Pidgin is no longer restricted to small talk; it is no longer the language of the uneducated.Although for a long time, Pidgin has been perceived as a language used mostly by illiterate and semi-literate persons, this mixed language has now gained currency among the educated in Cameroon as well.Francophone Kamtok is the variety spoken mainly in French-speaking cities such as Douala, Bafoussam and Yaoundé among others.