says it has 120 million registered users, and new users join the dating platform at a rate of 40,000 to 50,000 a day.

, while last year it got a lot of coverage following the cosmetic firm SK-II’s emotional advert on the subject, which went viral. He points to what he calls the “80/20 principle” in the animal kingdom, where 20 per cent of the male species “owns” 80 per cent of the females, leaving 80 per cent of males mateless.

“My view is that it’s the natural order of things to have leftover men, but you become a leftover woman by choice.

“The higher the earning power of the man, the more likely he would [be to] ask to date a younger woman,” Li says.

The more affordable “self-service” dating site is popular with those in their 20s, but he says there is a very definite trend that when women reach the age of 27 they opt for the more pricey matchmaking service.

That’s according to Dr Song Li, founder of, one of China’s biggest matchmaking sites – who apologises if his findings may not seem “politically correct”. Professors at the University of Hong Kong or a university in the UK or US might be interested in using our data to study the psychology of love,” says Li, who has the infectious enthusiasm and quirky personality commonly seen among bona fide serial entrepreneurs.

“I’d love it if our data could contribute to society.” He’s not kidding about the volume of data.

One of’s most in demand services is one that matches divorcees – it’s especially popular in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen.

“It’s getting more popular every year and we are even thinking perhaps we should develop a separate app due to the high demand,” says Li.

This is because the Chinese government aims to migrate an additional 250 million people from the countryside to the cities over the next decade – and he expects many of them to be potential customers.

China’s rising divorce rate is also driving business.

It’s a self-imposed criteria – she can always find a mate,” Li says.