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: Oct 27, 2013 – Thanks for all the great comments! Even though it’s kind of dusty around here, I’m hoping to be adding more soon. Making your own curtains is easy-peasy, and making lined curtains is just one step up from the plain ol’ kind (and lined curtains last longer, provide a better screen for hot sunlight, and probably have some other benefits I’m not thinking of right now).

This post has been incredibly more popular than I ever imagined. I hope I’ve been able to answer all your questions – some other very helpful folks have also left answers in their comments – I’ve tried to incorporate most of these into the tutorial but feel free to ask any more that I’ve missed. One side-effect I didn’t really expect is that making your own curtains is also very gratifying. ” Kind of hard to wrap my mind around, come to think of it.

When I did this project I actually didn’t realize there was such a thing as a blind hem foot, and just used my regular presser foot, while sewing carefully – I think I used the inside curve of the foot as a guide. Fold the top (both the liner fabric and the DF) over 1” and press, and 3 more inches and press again. Hang your curtain and step back and admire your brilliant (and lasting! Feel free to add your own recommendations and/or corrections to my instructions in the comments (I really appreciate these, so don’t hold back!

My hem was perhaps a teensy bit more wobbly than it would have been otherwise, but I think it turned out fine) Here’s my hem, all set up for me to sew it up with my super-special blind hem stitch (Actually I have a very basic machine, so I imagine nearly all machines have this stitch or something comparable or better. It thinks that it’s a super special blind hem stitch, and we might as well let it. This isn’t tricky at all – just turn both your DF and the liner right side together (as if you were making a pillow), and sew up both sides. You will have extra DF; make your crease with 2” (on either side) of the extra DF. Next, you want to sew a seam all the way down both sides, to hold the crease you just made in place. Sew along the bottom of this tube, making a tube that is about 3” tall.

Also, please read through the instructions before you start – you may find something I did that you would rather do differently and need to adjust accordingly. _UPDATE: A handy rule of thumb here – figure out how long you want your finished curtain to be, then add the extra inches you need for your rod pocket at the top and your hem at the bottom (in this case, my “formula” for the DF looked like this: fabric length = finished length 4”[rod] 7”[hem]).

Then you can figure out the measurements for the liner fabric based on that. With the wrong side facing you and the edge of the fabric intended for the lower edge of the drape pointed toward you, fold the bottom edge up 2” and press, then 5” more and press. Now you are going to do something called a “blind hem”.

My assistant Nicole asked me a bunch of questions from a readers point of view.

I get e-mails and comments regarding a lot of these questions so I felt this would be the best way to get back to everyone.

) is a helpful tool to give you an idea of what it is and how to do it: (note: The video says to do this hem you need to get a special blind hem foot for your sewing machine.

In actuality, you don’t really need a special foot to do this hem, but I imagine it would be helpful.

It just makes my sewing machine so happy.) If all this nonsense about blind hems just makes your head hurt, just do a regular hem – follow step 1 as directed, and then just go ahead and sew a straight seam across. Make sure you match up the edges of the fabric from the top down. I like lots (okay, 2”) of extra DF at the bottom (I think I saw a hanging curtain like that once – I don’t know if there’s a reason for the extra fabric), but if you prefer less, you can plan accordingly (cut more liner, or hem it up less). This is where the extra 2” in the cutting guide image above comes in handy.