As the credits roll, the issue of Greedo shooting first becomes incredibly irrelevant.

As such, it seemed to be a good opportunity to dip into the history of the genre, so below, we’ve run down some of the finest examples (and one or two less shining ones, that are nevetheless crucial in the development of the archetype) of the high school movie.

Have a look, and pay attention; there will be a test later…

As such, it’s no surprise that Crowe’s journalistic background meant that the film felt far more authentic than anything that had been seen in the genre up to that point, with a frankness that, while not exactly Larry Clark, remains a little shocking even today (one forgets that Jennifer Jason Leigh‘s character is only 15, for instance).

Thankfully, the film also contains the warmth and sweetness (and a killer soundtrack, including The Cars, Tom Petty and Led Zeppelin) that Crowe would become known for in later years as a director; the tentative romance between Brian Backer‘s Rat and Stacy is the template for much that would follow, while the not-as-wise-as-she-thinks-she-is Linda (Phoebe Cates) gives added dimension to a whole generation.

[A] “Grease” (1978) A raucous, occasionally air-headed but thoroughly heartfelt celebration of the carefree follies of youth, the Randall Kleiser-directed adaptation of Warren Casey and Jim Jacobs‘s 1971 musical remains equally charming to this day.

A spry, young John Travolta makes for a spirited Danny Zuko, a greaser harboring a gentle soul and carrying a torch for Sandy (Olivia Newton-John), a polite, conservative young woman whose values will be tested.

It’s a rote role, but a star is born the second Poitier steps on screen.

[C-] “The Last Picture Show” (1971) Anyone who’s read the excellent book “Easy Riders, Raging Bulls” (and seen its subsequent documentary adaptation) knows that director Peter Bogdanovich was once the toast of Hollywood during the ‘70s glory days, and much of it has to do with this fantastic and frank coming of age tale set in a small, desolate Texas town.

Brooks lenses it moodily, but the film is pure fearmongering (albeit with a liberal redemptive ending), and has dated very poorly, right down to Anne Francis‘ “I’m a silly woman, don’t listen to me” schtick.

But it’s worth watching for one reason in particular: the fiery turn from Sidney Poitier, in his breakout role as the provocative, troubled kid with a hidden talent for music.

That said, it’s not the most compelling thing to watch (it can get quite chatty at times) but the monotony of interior-car-scenes are thankfully broken up by some incredibly sincere, heartbreaking moments, including one where Dreyfuss catches a teacher/mentor engaging in a questionable act with a student.