Hopefully, you and your significant other are treating each other well. Take a step back from the dizzying sensation of being swept off your feet and think about whether your relationship has these qualities: A relationship is unhealthy when it involves mean, disrespectful, controlling, or abusive behavior.

Some people live in homes with parents who fight a lot or abuse each other — emotionally, verbally, or physically.

Someone who's not happy or secure may have trouble being a healthy relationship partner.

It's no wonder — you're both still growing and changing every day.

You might seem perfect for each other at first, but that can change.

Ever heard about how it's hard for someone to love you when you don't love yourself?

It's a big relationship roadblock when one or both people struggle with self-esteem problems.

Your girlfriend or boyfriend isn't there to make you feel good about yourself if you can't do that on your own.

Focus on being happy with yourself, and don't take on the responsibility of worrying about someone else's happiness.

And as the poet Rainer Maria Rilke mused, “There is scarcely anything more difficult than to love one another.” What makes a good relationship?

Holly Parker, a clinical psychologist and instructor of the course The Psychology of Close Relationships, offers her advice on how to have healthy and loving romantic relationships.

And if you're already part of a pair, make sure the relationship you're in brings out the best in both of you.