Later, he switched to using a webcam, according to a profile by Matt Bai in the New York Times Magazine.

Then came that fateful day in February 2009 on which, in a Yahoo chat room for adults, he conversed with “Emily.” Although she told him she was 15, Emily was actually a small-town police officer, trolling for sexual predators online.

Despite the expansion of the service, he still codes everything on his own.

Ternovskiy sought help from his longtime friend Vlad Kostanyan, who helped him with his side projects.

A user was twice as likely to encounter a sign requesting female nudity than to encounter actual female nudity.

The website uses Adobe Flash to display video and access the user's webcam.

Visitors to the website begin an online chat (text, audio and video) with another visitor.

At any point, either user may leave the current chat by initiating another random connection.

Just like Ritter, Plumridge engaged in online chat with an undercover police officer posing as a teenage girl, in this case a 13-year-old with the screen name of “Erin Princess Baby.” His defense was simple, according to a forthcoming article in Psychiatry, Psychology and Law: “He claimed that he knew the person with whom he was communicating was an older male and he was simply role playing.” At trial, he testified that the covert police operative inadvertently supplied various content cues as to his true age and gender.

For example, he signed off by saying "see ya later alligator," something no self-respecting 21st-century girl would say.

As law enforcement officers increasingly partake in trolling the internet for sexual predators in their spare time, it is probably only a matter of time before the Bond University study is introduced into court as evidence.