And when you’re plus-sized (or if your appearance doesn’t conform to mainstream beauty standards in other ways), dating can seem fraught with even more challenges.

It’s not a level playing field, and there’s no point pretending it is.

online dating for plus size-9

They’re all welcoming, popular, and free, and they allow you to filter potential matches by appearance and interests, among other identifiers.

Nowhere else online will you find more plus-size singles (and those who admire them) than on Match.

The good news is, your size doesn’t matter as much as you think it does. The Anti-Diet Project is an ongoing series about intuitive eating, sustainable fitness, and body positivity.

You can follow Kelsey's journey on Twitter and Instagram at @mskelseymiller, or right here on Facebook.

So it's not hard to imagine why plus-sized women are often ignored, ridiculed, and/or fetishized on dating apps.

Fortunately, sites seem to be trying to combat this problem.

"I'd get messages from men that would say things like, 'Do you want to meet up to have sex?

' And when I'd say no, they'd say, 'Oh, well you're fat, anyway.'" Craig says the criticism would bother her back then, before she'd started her successful fashion blog in 2013, found the body positivity movement, and started embracing her shape. While dating apps are notoriously scary spaces for women in general, with some 57% of female app users reporting some kind of harassment, plus-size women seem to have a tougher time than their "straight-sized" counterparts.

In fact, the plus-size dating app Woo Plus found that 71% of its 1,000 users reported having been fat-shamed on "regular" apps.

"I've had men message me and ask to feed me," says Laura Delarato, a sex-educator and branded video producer at . It's on regular sites like Ok Cupid and Tinder." According to Delarato, if you're a plus-size woman on a dating app, you should expect your body to be "the forefront of the conversation."The easy (and typical) explanation for this is that swipe-based dating apps have made us more shallow.

The last time I stressed out over this alleged holiday was in fifth grade, when the printer ran out of ink in the middle of printing cards for my classmates.