Publicity, especially from early examples such as “Christine” Jorgenson, “Jan” Morris, and “Renee” Richards, has promoted the idea that one’s biological sex is a choice, leading to widespread cultural acceptance of the concept.

It, like the storied Emperor, is starkly, nakedly false.

Transgendered men do not become women, nor do transgendered women become men.

As a result, we stopped offering that form of treatment in the 1970s.

Our efforts, though, had little influence on the emergence of this new idea about sex, or upon the expansion of the number of “transgendered” among young and old.

Over the last ten or fifteen years, this phenomenon has increased in prevalence, seemingly exponentially.

Now, almost everyone has heard of or met such a person.

Although they may be encouraged by his public reception, these children generally come to their ideas about their sex not through erotic interests but through a variety of youthful psychosocial conflicts and concerns.

First, though, let us address the basic assumption of the contemporary parade: the idea that exchange of one’s sex is possible.

The central issue with all transgender subjects is one of assumption—the assumption that one’s sexual nature is misaligned with one’s biological sex.

This problematic assumption comes about in several different ways, and these distinctions in its generation determine how to manage and treat it.

The most thorough follow-up of sex-reassigned people—extending over thirty years and conducted in Sweden, where the culture is strongly supportive of the transgendered—documents their lifelong mental unrest.