While the introduction of this technique dates back to the late 1940s, the departure of its popular use occurred in the early 1990s.The technique scarcely existed for a great deal of time, that is, up until Entertainment Studios recently reintroduced the methodology, airing three staged court shows as of the 2012–13 television season: America's Court with Judge Ross, We the People With Gloria Allred, and Justice for All with Judge Cristina Pérez.In 2001, the genre began to beat out soap operas in daytime television ratings.

Widely used techniques in court shows have been dramatizations and arbitration-based reality shows.

The genre began with dramatizations and remained the technique of choice for roughly six decades.

In outlined cases, actor-litigants and -witnesses were instructed to never get too far off the angle of the case.

Under its dramatized format, the early court show genre shared more of a resemblance to legal dramas than the programs that have come to represent the modern judicial genre.

In the mid-1930s, the Hauptmann trial sparked an upsurge of fascination with dramatized court shows wherein trials and hearings were acted out.

As radio fans were denied the vicarious thrill of eavesdropping on the actual courtroom trials, many turned to this venue of entertainment.Accordingly, by the end of the 2000s, the number of court shows in syndication had, for the first time, equaled the number of talk shows.The beginnings of the court show genre are embedded in radio broadcasting, dating back to the mid-1930s.At present, these shows typically portray small claims court cases, produced in a simulation of a small claims courtroom inside of a television studio.The genre began in radio broadcasting in the 1930s and moved to television in the late 1940s, beginning with such TV shows as Court of Current Issues, Your Witness, Famous Jury Trials, etc.Like talk shows, the procedure of court shows varies based upon the titular host.