These land grants to local notable families mark the beginning of the "Rancho Period" in California and Santa Barbara history.

The Mission fathers began the slow work of converting the native Chumash to Christianity, building a village for them on the Mission grounds.

The Chumash laborers built a connection between the canyon creek and the Santa Barbara Mission water system through the use of a dam and an aqueduct.

A land expedition led by Gaspar de PortolĂ  visited in 1769, and Franciscan missionary Juan Crespi, who accompanied the expedition, named a large native town "Laguna de la Concepcion".

Cabrillo's earlier name, however, is the one that has survived.

The first permanent European residents were Spanish missionaries and soldiers under Felipe de Neve, who came in 1782 to build the Presidio.

They were sent both to fortify the region against expansion by other powers such as England and Russia, and to convert the natives to Christianity.Santa Barbara street names reflect this time period as well.The names de le Guerra and Carrillo come from citizens of the town of this time.Channel Islands National Park and Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary are located approximately 20 miles (32 km) offshore.Evidence of human habitation of the area begins at least 13,000 years ago.In addition to being a popular tourist and resort destination, the city economy includes a large service sector, education, technology, health care, finance, agriculture, manufacturing, and local government.