Barnett considered the apology was not enough, since the officer's stereotypical idea still exists in society."The comment that was made by Officer Sanguinetti comes from a place where sexual profiling and victim blaming is inherent and a large trait and we’d like that changed," Barnett said, Toronto Police spokeswoman Meaghan Gray said cautioning women on their state of dress is not part of any police training.

Violent crimes such as sexual assaults can have a traumatizing effect on their victims... I am embarrassed by the comment I made and it shall not be repeated.

The apology was attached to an email distributed to the Osgoode community by law school dean Lorne Sossin who said they've been told the officer "is being disciplined and will be provided with further professional training." We are tired of being oppressed by slut-shaming; of being judged by our sexuality and feeling unsafe as a result.

Rhodes was sentenced to three years in prison in 2013.

Although the organizers expected around 200 people to show up, over 3,000 gathered at Queen's Park.

The day began with speeches before moving to the Toronto Police Headquarters.

The invitation in Slutwalk Toronto website also warned: "Whether a fellow slut or simply an ally, you don't have to wear your sexual proclivities on your sleeve: we just ask that you come.

To be sure, such a comment from law enforcement is highly offensive in suggesting that some victims of rape are responsible for the criminal acts of their attackers.

Rather than admonishing women to dress a certain way, police should be warning potential offenders that they should 'avoid assaulting women in order not to go to prison' —Gail Dines and Wendy J Murphy Justice Robert Dewar convicted Thompson resident Kenneth Rhodes, who worked for the city council, of sexual assault and sentenced him to two years house arrest.

But after she rebuffed his further advances three times he raped her by the side of the road once they were alone.

Rhodes admitted telling the woman 'it would only hurt for a little while' during the assault.

Prosecutors had asked for a three-year sentence, but Dewar gave Rhodes a conditional or suspended sentence, and ordered him to write a letter of apology to his victim.