VICE News has obtained footage taken from the headcam of an Islamic State (IS) fighter who died in March while battling Kurdish peshmerga troops in northern Iraq.

As well as quickly establishing fault, many dash-cam owners say the cameras make them better drivers.

Among them is David Doyle, from Manchester, who was in his car when he was smashed into at a road junction by a driver who ran through a red light.

Unlike IS propaganda, which often presents sweeping battlefield victories, the video shows chaos, panic, and the fighters retreating.

VICE News shows the grim reality of an IS foot soldier.

Although car crashes can often be traumatic, many people find that the bureaucratic aftermath can be even more upsetting.

Dash cams, with their unimpeachable record of any incident, are therefore becoming increasingly popular, and it looks certain that 2017 will see thousands of us forking out for a device that may soon become as ubiquitous as the satnav.But in this instance they were armed with a powerful piece of evidence that showed exactly where the blame lay – video footage from Mr Pettifor's dashboard camera, or 'dash cam'.'The police saw it right there and then and they instantly knew it was not my fault,' says Mr Pettifor.'It showed that I hadn't been speeding or driving badly.It ruled all that out, and entirely proved my innocence.'Better still, when it came to dealing with the normally time-consuming and frustrating business of making an insurance claim, the footage was equally useful as it comprehensively proved the Astra driver was at fault.Those of us unlucky enough to have spent weeks, if not months, wrangling with insurance companies in the wake of an accident will look upon Mr Pettifor's experience with an envious eye.It was just before 1 o'clock one Saturday morning in mid-October when John Pettifor left his mother's house at Fleet in Hampshire to head home.