We could have started shooting that day." Wool cashmere coat, Polo Ralph Lauren, 8, Gold and multicolor gemstone ring,

We could have started shooting that day." Wool cashmere coat, Polo Ralph Lauren, $598, Gold and multicolor gemstone ring, $1,125, sapphire ring, $330, both, Ariel Gordon; Almost a year after filming wrapped, Clarke can still slip into character when the mood strikes.cocreators David Benioff and Dan Weiss] and thanked them. ' Because I get a lot of crap for having done nude scenes and sex scenes. ' " In the scene, her disrobed cavalier was played by Dutch actor Michiel Huisman. David and Dan were like, 'You need to pull yourself together.

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We could have started shooting that day." Wool cashmere coat, Polo Ralph Lauren, $598, Gold and multicolor gemstone ring, $1,125, sapphire ring, $330, both, Ariel Gordon;

,125, sapphire ring, 0, both, Ariel Gordon;

She's a young woman on the make who wants to do the right thing, but when the expedient thing is called for, as it often is in the bloody alt-medieval world she inhabits, she'll have you hanged from the nearest lamppost without losing too much sleep over it. Gold and oxidized gilver bangle, $2,995, gold bangle, $5,080, both, Yossi Harari; Leather belt, What Goes Around Comes Around, $128; "I remember vividly the first time I met Emilia, which was in the hotel bar in Belfast, before season one," Harington recalls.

And when conventional realpolitik fails her, she'll play the dragon card (another honorific: "Mother of Dragons," a nonmetaphorical title) and materialize from a wall of flames, naked and purified, as her people swoon in wonder and her cold-blooded offspring swoop menacingly in the sky. "I was sort of bowled over by this absolutely stunning, petite girl with this wicked sense of humor.

For one, she's not allowed, contractually, to divulge any .

"This film dispels the very common interpretation that if you're going to do a big blockbuster, you just need to stick some muscles and a pair of boobs in, and that will be that," she says.

Yes, it's Shakespeare with CGI dragons, but still, the Bard's force is with her.

Emilia Clarke is the daughter of two strivers who raised her and her two-years-older brother in the bucolic countryside outside the university town of Oxford.

"I kind of have to go to museums and galleries and concerts." At the Whitney, the actress is in character as maybe her least publicly recognized guise: herself. And then some minutes later, in a characteristic fit of people-pleasing remorse: "I feel really bad about being so disgruntled about selfies.

Her fellow museumgoers haven't the slightest that if they were to turn their attentions, and their i Phones, in her direction, they could capture the woman responsible for one of the more iconic television images of our time: Daenerys leading her army of liberated slaves across the desert, a pop-culture mash-up of the aforementioned Joan, Lawrence of Arabia, and Eva Perón. "Once, I had someone run down the street after me and say, 'My friend says you're famous; can I get a picture? I increasingly sound like an old lady." Clarke, 30, hardly looks the part of an old lady, nor does she particularly resemble Dany, as "Thronies" are wont to call her.

Take that yet-to-be-shot final season of : "Oh God, I get sleepless nights over it. It's the last season, and it's going to go wrong.' My mates are like, 'It's you—you [and Daenerys] are one and the same now. And you don't have to take a refresher course in Carl Jung or Joseph Campbell to recognize the different forms it takes: lover, warrior, mother, at times something close to messiah.

Take, for example, the close to season three, when Daenerys is carried aloft by a multitude of slaves she has just liberated; Clarke's face, in extreme close-up, ecstatic—a rock 'n' roll goddess at a medieval rave.

An English tea-rose complexion, full lips and, yes, Dany's prominent brows add up to a friendly beauty.